Polar Vortex and Other Stuff

Here’s a blog today about certain wildlife species most likely to be affected by the polar vortex.

In the blog, I mention Vladimir Dinets’ new book, Dragon Songs. It isn’t a mammal book, but it is by one of our own mammal watchers, so I’ll plug it here. Simply: it is a great and fun book that you should read. It is about his research on the communication of alligators and other crocodilians, a very interesting bit of research. But it’s more.

Vladimir’s life seems more like something out of a Victorian-era adventure story than a modern PhD program. He has some truly wacky field experiences and the one liners are fantastic. I’d quote them but I’m planning a full blog review later this month. And there’s plenty of great mammals along the way. So: buy the book.

Finally, here’s another blog I wrote this week on spotting jaguars. I know most of you know this info, but feel free to post additional advice on where to see jaguars on Cool Green Science.

Happy new year.
Matt Miller

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2 Comments on “Polar Vortex and Other Stuff”


  1. I’ve got to agree with Matt about Vladimir’s book, it’s a fantastic read! There’s plenty of mammals mentioned although personally I find crocodilians almost as fascinating. I would definitely recommend the book to readers of this blog and anyone else with an interest in travel and/or natural history.


  2. Thanks a lot! Accidentally, I also like the book, although I wish the size limits were less strict and more non-crocodilian stuff could be included 🙂


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