Wild Burma: Nature’s Lost Kingdom

Just a quick note to bring this programme to everyone’s attention, as all three episodes are currently available on the BBC iPlayer.

Really interesting watching the Smithsonian team in action and some great shots of some really rare mammals.

Have always wanted to visit Burma and it could be a hell of a trip if you can get access to the right areas.

Anyone planning to go, as I would be interested in putting something together at some stage….Jon?

Jason

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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6 Comments on “Wild Burma: Nature’s Lost Kingdom”

  1. Israel Says:

    I’m going in a couple of weeks. Not sure how many mammals I’ll see though. For a lot of the country (outside the tourist triangle) you need to organise extremely expensive officially-appointed-guide-accompanied tours. Fortunately the triangle includes a number of good animal sites (at least for birds — nobody ever seems to mention mammals!); there should be some mammals along the way as well.

  2. John Fox Says:

    I would try to do a trip to Burma. I’m subscribed to the thread if a plan emerges.

  3. Jon Hall Says:

    Hi Jason, I was meant to be visiting Myanmar in January for work… a trip that has fallen through unfortunately. And yes I’d be interested in going one day though it sounds like a difficult country to operate in. I can’t see the program as iplayer is only for the UK (or so it seems). I will keep looking for it though but what are the more interesting mammals that feature? Did they find a Golden Cat and a Sun Bear (I see both are mentioned on episode 2)

    jon

  4. jasonwoolgar Says:

    Sorry, very quick response to these, as I fly to Costa Rica in a few hours.

    Programme was mixed, as most of these are, but I have seen it and there were some nice shots of a lot of rare mammals and also some encouraging news regarding Tigers in one area.

    Although lacking a great deal of specific detail, it was a decent overview of the wildlife of the country and it is good to keep in mind that the main purpose of the study was to persuade the government to fully commit to protecting incredibly diverse but highly vulnerable habitat.

    Camera trap pictures of those species Jon, but I am going to get the full species list from the Smithsonian and will forward it when I get back.

    It will be a bit of an expedition I feel, as the tourist spots are going to be of little use regarding most of the animals that we will be looking for.

    My next big project is looking for Bay Cat and a few other species in Borneo in July and I will therefore probably start researching this in detail later next year, as I believe that we are going to need to apply for permission to visit certain areas and that a successful trip is going to involve a great deal of planning.

    I will keep you updated and, meanwhile, any relevant information would be much appreciated.

    Thanks

    Jason


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